A Christmas Carol (Der Weihnachtsabend) – Charles Dickens

“…and it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One!

A Christmas Carol – by Charles Dickens

Download the ebook for free at the Project Gutenberg.

~~~

“…und immer sagte man von ihm, er wisse Weihnachten recht zu feiern, wenn es überhaupt ein Mensch wisse. Möge dies auch in Wahrheit von uns allen gesagt werden können! Und so schließen wir mit Tiny Tims Worten: Gott segne uns alle und jeden!”

Der Weihnachtsabend – von Charles Dickens

Download des e-books kostenlos beim Project Gutenberg.

~~~

Bild

(Excerpt from Wikipedia:)

“Legacy

While the ‘Merry Christmas’ was popularized following the appearance of the story,[58] and the name “Scrooge” and exclamation “Bah! Humbug!” have entered the English language,[59] Ruth Glancy argues the book’s singular achievement is the powerful influence it has exerted upon its readers. In the spring of 1844, The Gentleman’s Magazine attributed a sudden burst of charitable giving in Britain to Dickens’s novella; in 1874, Robert Louis Stevenson waxed enthusiastic after reading Dickens’s Christmas books and vowed to give generously; and Thomas Carlyle expressed a generous hospitality by staging two Christmas dinners after reading the book.[60] In America, a Mr. Fairbanks attended a reading on Christmas Eve in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1867, and was so moved he closed his factory on Christmas Day and sent every employee a turkey.[33] In the early years of the 20th century, the Queen of Norway sent gifts to London’s crippled children signed “With Tiny Tim’s Love”; Sir Squire Bancroft raised £20,000 for the poor by reading the tale aloud publicly; and Captain Corbett-Smith read the tale to the troops in the trenches of World War I.[61]

According to historian Ronald Hutton, the current state of observance of Christmas is largely the result of a mid-Victorian revival of the holiday spearheaded by A Christmas Carol. Hutton argues that Dickens sought to construct Christmas as a self-centred festival of generosity, in contrast to the community-based and church-centred observations, the observance of which had dwindled during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.[62] In superimposing his secular vision of the holiday, Dickens influenced many aspects of Christmas that are celebrated today in Western culture, such as family gatherings, seasonal food and drink, dancing, games, and a festive generosity of spirit.[63]

This simple morality tale with its pathos and theme of redemption significantly redefined the “spirit” and importance of Christmas, since, as Margaret Oliphant recalled, it “moved us all those days ago as if it had been a new gospel.”[64] and resurrected a form of seasonal merriment that had been suppressed by the Puritan quelling of Yuletide pageantry in 17th-century England.[65]

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “A Christmas Carol (Der Weihnachtsabend) – Charles Dickens

  1. susaslounge says:

    Reblogged this on Susas Lounge and commented:

    Reblogging my own things for a change… :)… and by doing that… wishing you all a very Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah to my Jewish friends, and Season’s Greetings to all, whatever you might celebrate these days!

    Fröhliche Weihnachten und Frohe Festtage, ein Fröhliches Hanukkah an meine jüdischen Freunde und die besten Wünsche für alle, was auch immer sie in diesen Tagen feiern mögen…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. M.A. says:

    Thanks for this testament of the power of language and the imagination to move and change us. And that’s so much for your interaction with me and your support. :~) I hope the holidays bring you peace and serenity.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s